Frenchy Cannoli: The Man That Reinvented Cannabis Hash

Frenchy Cannoli: The Man That Reinvented Cannabis Hash

Cheap Home Grow is lucky enough to have world-renowned cannabis has maker Frenchy Cannoli on the show this week. Frenchy has been featured in numerous publications throughout his career including Vice news.  He goes into detail about his rich history as a master hash maker. He talks about certain formulas and procedures he’s invented help the average home grower accurately produce their own hash.

It was a pleasure talking to Frenchy and I look forward to having him back on the show in the months to follow. I would also like to extend my thanks to “Jack” from JackGreenStalk on Instagram for helping me formulate these questions.

Frenchy’s Background:

– World Traveller. Traveled for nearly 20 years. From 18-36 years old
– At 17 Frenchy started to smoke hash
Visit Frenchy Cannoli Website

Question answered during the show:

1. How did he come up with the idea for “pressing french style” using hot water, glass bottle, cooking aka turkey bags and pot holders to roll it out? What does it do and why does he do it to the hash?

2. Why ice water sieve over dry sieve? what are advantages and disadvantages to both and what ultimately led you to focus so much on teaching ice water techniques for making hash?

3. Can you explain how although water can be a solvent for some things, how is water, not a solvent when considering how it is used to sieve resin?

4. Can you explain how freezers have been introduced to change drying hash, and tell us a bit about how that is different than traditional hash drying and curing process? What happens while hash is curing?

5. Historically speaking, which regions of the world are known for making hash? did they have similar techniques to each other/how do their techniques hold up vs. today’s modern technology when it comes to producing hash?

6. You’ve written extensively about the history of hash. I read an interesting note you wrote about how in Afghanistan hash is made from flowers that have been dried and cured traditionally in an airtight goat skin for months, while most other countries that are traditionally known for making hash use live plants to collect resin… Why do you think Afghanistan was different?
To clarify, the plants dried and sieved prior to putting the collected resin (trichome heads) in the goat skin bags, and not all resin (trichome heads) are cured underground in goatskins. This was one interesting technique used in the past but it’s not widely practiced. It just wouldn’t be economical or convenient so it might be confusing for your audience if you reference the tech used in Afganistan this way.
But more importantly, most other producing countries are NOT using live plants to collect the trichome heads. Collecting the resin off of live plants is done in Northern India and Nepal by gently hand-rubbing the plant. The resulting product is called “charas”.
Otherwise, traditional hashish is made by collecting the trichome heads from the dried and cured plants. The resulting product is traditional hashish. The drying process can vary from country to country based on physical space available, weather issues, etc. but generally involves bundling the plants to dry in a shed or room specifically used for that purpose, or laying them out in the field or on a flat rooftop to dry in the sun.
So to sum up the definitions:
Concentrate made from live plants collected trichome heads = charas
Concentrate made from dried and cured plant collected trichome heads = traditional hashish

7. Can you explain the benefits of Freshly Harvest cannabis being used and the impact it has on terpenes you can capture within the hash?

8. Your process uses a washing machine to spin the water, why do you recommend that people use this instead of something they might have laying around the house. Like an egg beater or a power drill with paint mixer or similar attachments which can also create a vortex and spin the water? +/what other common mistakes do you see newcomers to hash making run into, and how can they avoid these pitfalls?

9. I saw in your green leaf magazine article that during the transformation into hash using ancient methods over 50 new and rare compounds can be found which are traced to live and dried plants.. what are some of those rare compounds found in hash you wrote about? Original article can be found here

10. Is there any questions I haven’t asked you that I should be asking/is there anything you wanted to talk about more in detail you’d like to discuss/want people to know

A big thanks to Jay Fratt from The Conservative Hippie and Smoking Js for the intro and outro for my podcast.